Cool Tool – Screen Rulers

by DanB

I have used screen rulers for years. What is a screen ruler? A small graphic ruler that sits on your screen and lets you measure things. Sound pretty boring right? When you start using the ruler you find many uses: checking margins, working with photos, web pages, printing, and lots more. Just lining things up in some applications becomes much easier. Many applications have rulers at the edges but being able to put the ruler anywhere on the screen can often save a lot of time.

My favorite ruler was Cool Ruler but I have not been able to get it running on my 64-bit Windows 7 machine and the company that made it, FabSoft.com, no longer lists it on their website. Here is a video showing the rulers I currently use.

JR Screen Ruler is for Windows:
http://www.spadixbd.com/freetools/jruler.htm

JR Screen Ruler is the ruler I have used the most. It does not let you make tick marks but you can just hang the cursor off the bottom of the ruler and see the measurement. I do find resizing the ruler a little tedious. I have not used the pro version of the tool.

A Ruler for Windows:
http://www.arulerforwindows.com/

A Ruler for Windows allows one tick mark, a center mark, marks for thirds, and even allows you to change the skin. I personally like the classic look of the wooden ruler. Resizing this ruler is a bit tedious as well but not too bad. I did find the buttons a bit small. You can even magnify the screen and the ruler adjusts accordingly. On the whole I like A Ruler for Windows very much.

Working on a Mac? You might take a look at Free Ruler:

http://www.pascal.com/software/freeruler/

I have not used the Macintosh version.

Share your experience with screen rulers in the comments.

Cool Tool – Screen Rulers

I have used screen rulers for years. What is a screen ruler? A small graphic ruler that sits on your screen and lets you measure things. Sound pretty boring right? When you start using the ruler you find many uses: checking margins, working with photos, web pages, printing, and lots more. Just lining things up in some applications becomes much easier. Many applications have rulers at the edges but being able to put the ruler anywhere on the screen can often save a lot of time.

My favorite ruler was Cool Ruler but I have not been able to get it running on my 64-bit Windows 7 machine and the company no longer lists it on their website. Here is what I currently use.

JR Screen Ruler is for Windows:
http://www.spadixbd.com/freetools/jruler.htm

JR is the ruler I have used the most. It does not let you make tick marks but you can just hang the cursor off the bottom of the ruler and see the measurement. I do find resizing the ruler a little tedious. I have not used the pro version of the tool.

A Ruler for Windows:
http://www.arulerforwindows.com/

A Ruler for Windows allows one tick mark, a center mark, marks for thirds, and even allows you to change the skin. I personally like the classic look of the wooden ruler. Resizing this ruler is a bit tedious as well but not too bad. I did find the buttons a bit small. You can even magnify the screen and the ruler adjusts accordingly. On the whole I like A Ruler for Windows very much.

Working on a Mac? You might take a look at Free Ruler:

http://www.pascal.com/software/freeruler/

I have not used the Macintosh version.

  • http://thedoorway.org/ Charles Heineke

    Thanks for the tips, Dan.

    Here’s another option. PicPick is a more robust, all-in-one graphics utility, in a small footprint, that combines a screen ruler with many other utilities, in one small TSR (terminate and stay resident) tool that sits quietly in your system tray until you need it. It’s available as freeware from http://www.picpick.org/.

    It includes a graphics editor, a powerful, multi-purpose screen capture, color picker, color palette, magnifier, pixel ruler (screen ruler), protractor, cross-hairs, and a whiteboard, all for free.

    I’ve used it for years under Windows. I still use it now even under Linux, with WINE running it as a Windows program. The site says its compatible with Windows 7, it supports dual screens, supports 28 languages, and requires no registry and no access to System folder. You can also copy its files to a portable USB.

    I wouldn’t be without it. Do yourself a favor and check it out at http://www.picpick.org/.

  • Phil

    Thanks Dan.  Never thought of this before but I do use the
    rulers in several imaging programs.  This is so much easier.

  • http://www.tnpcnews.com/ DanB

    It is surprising how a small change can make a big difference.

    Dan

  • CDix

    Maybe old news by now, but I too liked Cool Ruler pre-Windows 7 and found I could still run it in Windows 7 if I installed v2.0 in something earlier (say WinXP) then copied the program files into a Win7 environment via a USB stick. If this was going to work, I was expecting to need to amend the coolruler.exe file’s compatibility, but, no, it worked immediately.

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  • Guest

    The method CDix described for Windows 7 is also working with Windows 8.1, tested with 64 bit. Seems CoolRuler which is a very cool ruler indeed, could live forever – hopefully

  • 2nd Guest

    Cool Ruler was my favorite too, and I was giving up hope until I read CDix’s comments. It works perfectly for me as well, on Win 8.1 64 bit. Thanks!!

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